DIY HYDROPONIC SYSTEMS

3 Dynamic and Delightful Deep Water Culture System Designs

Deep Water Culture

DWC, or deep water culture system designs, is the simplest of systems and features a styrofoam raft, lid, or another method to allow the roots too, either float on or hover over nutrient-rich water-filled reservoir. An air pump disperses bubbles throughout for additional oxygen.

This is a great hydroponic system to start with because there is a shortlist of materials needed, it is easy to put together, and the cost is inexpensive. Deepwater culture system designs work phenomenally well when used as an Aquaponics system.

 

 

Deep Water Culture System Designs: The Raft System

 

Overview

Creating a traditional deep water culture system is simple. All you have to do is connect the tubing to the air pump, and connect it to the airstone at the other end of the tube. After everything is connected, fill the tub with water.

To prep, the styrofoam for planting, cut holes about 2 inches in diameter and place the net pots inside. Fill the net pots with your preferred grow medium (we like coco coir and gravel), and then plant your seedlings. This system works phenomenally well when floating over an Aquaponics fish tank as your reservoir.

Deep Water Culture System Designs -Totes Container
Deep Water Culture System Designs -Totes Container, GrowWithoutSoil.com

 

Budget

$65

Build time

A few hours

System size

4 plants

Area

23.5 in. L x 14.5 in. W x 13 in. H

Pros

This system is easy to use and the roots will receive the nutrients immediately, spurring growth. The materials are easy to find in a local home store, and it doesn’t take an engineering degree to put it together.

Cons

There is not a lot of room for plants and the system will need to be topped off with water frequently.

 

 

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Deep Water Culture Designs

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Bucket

 

Overview

This simple to use system will make hydroponic gardening fun for you, and this is a great way to introduce children to gardening. Although you only grow one plant at a time, this will teach you the system of DWC gardening and is a great place to start.

To create this system, attach the airstone to the air pump via the tubing, and fill the bucket with water. Cut a hole in the top of the bucket, and slide the net pot in, and then plant the seedling.

 

DWC Bucket Design
DWC Bucket Design, Source

 

Budget

$50

Build time

A few hours

System size

1 plant

Area

14.5 inches high and 11.91 inches wide at the top

Pros

The DWC bucket method is very simple to use and a nice way to concentrate on one plant at a time without others getting in the way. This is also a great method if you would like to try hydroponics but are not sure you want to fully invest.

Cons

Because you are only growing one plant per bucket, you will not get much yield. This might seem like a lot of work for one plant.

 

 

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Deep Water Culture Designs

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Recirculating DWC

Totes-with-Lid Recirculate Deep-Water-Culture Design
Totes-with-Lid Recirculate Deep-Water-Culture Design, GrowWithoutSoil.com

 

Overview

Creating a recirculating deep water culture system is a little more intense than the traditional DWC system. You do need to understand how water levels work and have the knowledge of how to cut and attach pipes. This is a great system for a variety of plants that you don’t want to water one by one.

 

Use the grommets to attach the tubing to a variety of buckets so that the water can flow in and out of each bucket.

 

Budget

$100

Build time

One day

System size

8 plants (one per bucket)

Area

Approximately 4 feet by 6 feet

Pros

Using this system allows you to water a variety of plants at once, which saves you time and energy in the long run.

Cons

There is not a lot of room for plants and the system will need to be topped off with water frequently.

 

 

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Deep Water Culture Designs

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Dani

Dani

I'm Dani, I come from a long history of migrant farmers. In high school I wrote a paper about how my father brought us over the Texas border to give us a better life. During college, I worked part time with him in the farming industry. After receiving a degree in Urbanism from Columbia University, I started to realize how important the role of the food chain was to urban inner cities. I began studying different types of Indoor and vertical faming solutions. I started designing and building my own hydroponic systems and have never looked back.