DIY HYDROPONIC SYSTEMS

The Incredible Fogponics System: 3 Designs

Fogponics

If you’ve been working with some less intensive systems (We’re looking at you, Kratky system enthusiasts!) and really want to start diving into the more complex end of soil-free gardening, then fogponics might be what you’re after.  These systems use fog to directly coat the roots of your plants in moisture and nutrients.  The result is a plant that has very little to do other than grow, expand, and flourish.  Large-scale produce makers can enjoy working with plants that are primed for growth and hobbyists can enjoy the intricacies of keeping plants alive with fog.

 

The Fogponics system, from afar, appears to be really advanced and it certainly utilizes technology that other hydroponics systems don’t.  With all of the parts required for these systems, it really feels like they could truly only be built in one way, but that isn’t true.  The reality is that there are several types of fogponics systems to choose from and they each have a variety of advantages of disadvantages.  While there certainly are the fully teched-out versions of this system style out there, it doesn’t have to be beyond the reach of the average person.  Today, let’s investigate some of the best fogponics systems all over that range of complexity!

 

 

Fan and Fogger Fogponics System 

 

Overview

Fan and fogger systems are quite basic and suitable for beginners.  They use each potential part of a full fogponics system and are composed of these simple parts:  a fan, a timer-connected fogger, a reservoir container with a lid, and net pots placed into the lid.  The water and nutrient mixture is directly below the plants and the fogger and fan combo help ensure that the nutrient-rich fog gets to the roots of all of the plants.  The fan (or fans, depending on the total size of the system) can be placed either in the system’s lid or in, on the side of the reservoir.  The fan should be facing inwards, blowing towards the fogger and roots.

 

 

Budget

Approx. $60 for DIY builds

Build Time

Weekend project

System Size 

12-16 plants/reservoir

Area

From 2 foot long X 4 foot wide X 4 foot tall (size of the reservoir)

Pros

Compact system.  Relatively simple to construct.

Cons

Requires cutting.  Only works for one reservoir.

 

 

Learn more 

Fogponics Designs

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Build this system

 

 

 

 

Fog Pump

 

Overview

Fog pump systems are very similar to fan and fogger systems but rely on a fogger to pull water in from an external reservoir to mist the plants.  One bit of complexity with this system is that you’ll need to have at least two compartments – one or more plant containers AND the reservoir – as well as create a connection for the drain and fogger between the two.  While this does require some cutting, it shouldn’t be overly difficult if you follow our guides.

 

There is no fan needed in this system as the compartment holding the plants can be relatively small.  As a result, this style of the system should have a somewhat shorter compartment to hold the plants.  When the mist goes into this smaller compartment it will be able to thoroughly drench the exposed roots and you can expect some condensing water to drop below them.  This excess water needs a drain so it can get back down into the reservoir.

 

 

Budget

Approx. $120

Build Time

Weekend / Several days

System Size

12-16 plants/reservoir

Area

From 2 foot long X 4 foot wide X 4 foot tall (size of the reservoir) + containers

Pros

Easily expandable to more plant containers.  Can use shallow plant containers.

 

Cons

Requires cutting.  Lengthy initial setup.

 

 

Learn more 

Fogponics Designs

Buy this system

Build this system

 

 

 

 

1-Plant-1-Nebulizer 

 

Overview

This system is inspired by hardcore scientists that want absolute control over each individual specimen in their build.  If it is more about the plants and the cool science for you, then just might be for you.  One great thing is that the roots can be completely surrounded by the

 

There is quite a bit of setup time required since you’re going to be making a separate nebulizer connection for each individual in your collection, but this fogponics system pays for it in folds by really giving you that extra bit of control.

 

For those really into this style of system,   are having success by adding a raspberry pi (a sort of mini-computer) and a humidity sensor to gain control over even more parts of the environment.  You can even add programming to control certain groups of plants at the same time.

 

 

Budget

$400+  There is a lot of variation in-depth here.

Build Time

Several Days / Weekends

System Size

12-16 plants

Area

4 foot long X 4 foot wide X 4 foot tall

Pros

Highly customizable.  Each plant gets individual attention.  Extraordinarily hi-tech.

Cons 

Time-consuming setup.  Requires a lot of equipment/power.  Expensive.

 

 

Learn more 

Fogponics Designs

Buy this system

Build this system

 

 

 

Conclusion

Whether you are getting your fogponics system now or in the future, you can start to think about these variations in systems and what will fit your needs best.  Even if you are the type that really wants to go all out and focus on each individual plant, don’t think you have to start with an intensive 1-plant-1-nebulizer system with full-on compute automation.  Getting your hands dirty with a great fan and fogger system will help you learn about the intricacies and efficacy of the system quickly and with less initial investment.

 

As these systems are a bit trickier to build than most, please be sure to visit our guides and pro tips for each build.  Sometimes getting things to work correctly all comes down to using the right materials or having the right equipment available.  If you have the time and are dedicated, fogponics systems can really be an enchanting step into the interesting tech of no soil crop and flower production!

 

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Johnny

Johnny

John Alexander is a writer, English language educator, and plant enthusiast. After graduating from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, he began working in labs filled with plants - identifying their seeds, counting their pollen, extracting their DNA, and (of course!) watering them as needed. Nowadays, he is focused more on words and language, whether that be teaching or writing.